The Busy Box For The Miserable

Ed Zitron
4 min readOct 17, 2022

When I got my first “big” client — one that allowed me to have a personal extravagance — I purchased a 65" plasma Panasonic Viera TV. I used it constantly for 9 years, before it eventually giving up the ghost and dying on me. I watched some of my favorite movies and shows of all time on that TV, and it followed me across the country until choosing to die in California.

It wasn’t about being proud of it, or showing people it, or having it as a means of proving something, but it became the centerpiece of entertainment — gaming and TV — and I can remember no less than 15 very funny times I was watching or playing something in front of it. As my business and quasi-fame grew, I would still use the same TV, playing games and watching movies as I had when I was working for someone else. I was still enjoying things I enjoyed in 2009 on the TV when I purchased it in 2012, and I’d enjoy very similar things on it until 2020. While I am not endlessly successful, I have been lucky enough to reach where I am, and yet I am still plodding away, deeply happy to do the same things I’ve done for years with a big, dumb grin on my face.

I bring this up because I believe we are currently in a renaissance in which we realize how dreadfully miserable, boring, and joyless many famous people are.

David Sacks, a venture capitalist and podcast host who had his brain turned into wet cardboard during the pandemic, has recently published a terrifyingly silly op-ed saying that “Neocons and the Woke Left Are Joining Hands and Leading Us to Woke War III.”

To give you an idea of Sacks’ wealth, he sold his company Yammer to Microsoft for $1.2 billion in 2012. Assuming that Sacks held 15% of vested company stock, he would have had over $100 million in cash after taxes, meaning that his time as a human being that experiences anything approaching friction has ended. Sacks could afford to fly privately from San Francisco to New York every day for a year and still have over three-quarters of the money left over. While doing so, Sacks could hire a “Diet Coke Guy” who walks around with a cooler of Diet Cokes and hands him one every few minutes, and happily compensate this man $150,000 a year, all while maintaining huge residences in both New York and San Francisco.

Instead, Sacks chose to warn us of “Woke War III,” wading into a debate he does not understand with the fury of a thousand suns. One might think that this op-ed was about the greater concept of being woke — that…

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Ed Zitron

CEO @EZPR . British. 2x author, writer @thisisinsider , @TheAtlantic — Top 50 @bitech tech PR 4x — http://ez.substack.com — The BBQ Joker